Badminton Grips & Footwork

In this section will help to improve your grip and give you advice on better footwork. We cover handshake grip, thumb grip, lunge, when they are used and much more.

This type of step formation can be used to deliver a powerful shot from the back of the court. In this shot the legs switch position in mid air resembling the closing and then opening of scissors. It is often proceeded by a chasses step, so the player will find they are still moving backwards when the jump is started. Stage one is to jump straight off the ground, then swap your dominant foot with your non dominant foot in mid air with the non dominant foot landing momentarily before the other.

The lunge is frequently used in badminton. For the purpose of the drill start in the ready position and then stretch the racket foot out. Making sure that the heel touches the floor first place the racket foot on the ground, then move to the toes. Bend the knee of the racket foot taking care to keep the shoulders back and balanced above the hips. Use the none racket arm behind the body to balance the move.

This type of step formation can be used to move to any corner of the court, and does allow players to move further and faster, especially towards the net. The next phase is to move the non-dominant foot up behind and slightly closer to the corner, so the back leg is slightly crossed behind the front leg. Then once again move the racket leg forward in the direction of the shuttle, and extend the racket arm out in front of the body.

Badminton Grips - here we cover how to hold the racket. The handshake grip and the backhand thumb grip are demonstrated below.

This step is used for travelling quickly across the court. The step-close step footwork uses the non-dominant foot (left foot for a right handed player) as a pivot and the dominant foot as the leading foot. The non-dominant foot is the one that also closes the body away from the shuttle hence the name step-close step.

This type of step formation can be used to move to any corner of the court, and does allow players to move further and faster, especially towards the net.

Being in the ready position allows players to move sharply in the direction that the shuttle is travelling. In the ready position a players feet should be square, or slightly staggered depending on the player and how they feel most comfortable.

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