Sorry we don't have video yet for these drills so they are all listed in this article and get progressively more difficult. Here we describe further progressions for passing, shooting, volleying and attacking.

11 - Passing 1

The coach and player pass the ball between them using a very simple side foot passing technique. The coach reminds the player to pass the ball with the inside of the foot through the middle of the ball keeping their eye on the ball. Do 10 good passes on the good foot then change to do 10 good passes on the not so good foot. This can be progressed to alternate right foot then left foot.

12 - Passing 2

The coach and player stand 5 to 10 meters apart. The player makes an accurate pass to the coach who makes a simple pass back then moves 3 yards to the side to receive another pass. The coach moves backwards and forwards with the player making accurate passed at each point. If you have a goal then you can use it as a guide and the coach can stand on the goal line and move from one corner of the goal to the next.

 

13 - Shooting

Player stands 5 meters or so away from a wall with a target marked about 30cm high x 50cm wide. The coach stands directly to the side of the player and feeds a gentle pass for the player to hit first time towards the target. Remind the player to keep their eye on the ball and strike low and hard.

If the coach is to the right of the player then the player strikes with the right foot if feeding from the left, strikes with the left foot.

See if you can manage 10 hits on target with each foot before moving on. Experts will make it 10 out of 10 first time.

If you don't have a wall then a number of balls and a couple of cones will make a good target. This one can be made more difficult by varying the distance. If the player makes a mess of it then tell them to slow it down and strike more gently.

 

 16 - Half Volley

Player stands 5 meters or so away from a wall with a target marked about 30cm high x 50cm wide. The coach stands to the side and in front of the player and throws the ball in underarm, gently so the player can strike on the half volley towards. Tell the player to strike the ball just as it starts to bounce upwards.

If the coach is to the right of the player then the player strikes with the right foot if feeding from the left, strikes with the left foot.

See if you can manage 10 hits on target with each foot before moving on. Experts will make it 10 out of 10 first time.

Repeat this drill with the coach directly to the side of the player and finally most difficult diagonally from behind. Make sure you work both feet equally.

 

17 - Volley

This is the same drill as the half volley but the ball is struck before it bounces. Player stands 5 meters or so away from a wall with a target marked about 30cm high x 50cm wide. The coach stands to the side and in front of the player and throws the ball in underarm, gently and directly onto the players foot. Tell the player to strike the ball before it bounces, keeping their eye on the ball.

If the coach is to the right of the player then the player strikes with the right foot if feeding from the left, strikes with the left foot.

See if you can manage 10 hits on target with each foot before moving on. Experts will make it 10 out of 10 first time.

Repeat this drill with the coach directly to the side of the player and finally most difficult diagonally from behind. Make sure you work both feet equally.

 

18 - Attacking 1

This drill requires players to think up actions and use agility to beat their opponent. For this drill an area of about 6M wide and 5M long area. Goals should be set up about 75-100cm wide at either ends of the pitch.

The teacher should not tackle the pupil, but should hassle them, giving them 90% of possession, due to the attacker must be made to feel confident, experimenting with new actions. The pupil should be aloud to get past them, but using their own initiative only. Remind the pupil to keep looking up, and do not allow them to shoot from a distance.

This is a good opportunity for the pupil to gain confidence on the ball. Try to move the ball away from the teacher in to space at all times. Only dive in if you are sure you will win the ball. Clumsy mistakes can loose a game. The best way to win the ball from an attacker is to anticipate his movements. Try to be patient, watching to see if the teacher makes an error. Turn at the same speed he does.

 

19 - One to One Defending

This is a slight variation from the one to one attacking exercise. Now the teacher is the attacker, and will be testing the pupils defensive skills. Try to confuse the pupil with some skills. Keep the ball in your own possession at least 50% of the time.

Encourage the pupil not to dive in to the tackle, tell him the jockey and be patient, waiting for the correct time to tackle you. Keep him on his toes, so he is ready to strike at any chosen time, in this case, where he is confident he can win the ball.

The pupil should not rush any tackles unless they are certain of winning the ball. Mistakes in a one to one position where they are the last man, can lead to loosing the game. To become a good tackler, the defender should be able to anticipate the attackers movements.

 

20 - Meeting the ball from a pass

Too often in a game of football children wait for a pass to arrive at their feet, or they will run forwards, not expecting a pass from behind. In both cases the ball is likely to be lost. It even happens in professional football, but being able to meet the ball correctly is a good skill for any player to have, no matter their position.

The teacher should throw the ball into the pupil from different directions, at different speeds and at different heights. The pupil should meet the ball as quickly as possible but should also be able to put the ball under control quickly.

 

21 - Throwing the ball further

Throw ins are easy to practice, as they can be done anywhere. To throw a ball further, make sure you are holding the ball correctly firstly.

  • Spread your fingers to the side and behind of the ball and thumbs at the bottom pointing towards each other.
  • Bring the ball behind your head and bend your knees.
  • Bend the back slightly towards the ground. You should now feel like if you were to throw the ball, you would throw it up.

 

22 - Meeting the ball from a throw in

Meeting the ball from a throw in can be the difference between scoring a goal or not. Due to offside not being an issue with throw ins, being able to get behind your defender and meet the ball, can create a goal scoring opportunity.

For this exercise, the teacher will be throwing the ball to the pupil, for them to meet and bring under control. But, the pupil will not know when the ball is coming.

The teacher should hold the ball behind their head in the correct throw in position. The pupil will have his back turned to the teacher, and start jogging away when commanded. When the teacher decides to they will shout "turn". At this point the defender will turn and jog towards the teacher ready to meet the ball. The teacher should then choose a relevant time to throw the ball. The ball should be thrown at different heights, making the player think on his feet and be ready to control the ball with any part of his body, for instance, his knee, chest, foot.

 

23 - Meeting the ball from a throw in 2

This is a progression from the last drill. However, it still involves the pupil being able to meet the ball and control it at any chose time.

In this drill, the pupil will do the same as in the last drill. He will have his back turned and wait until instructed and then turn and meet the ball. However, in this drill, instead of jogging towards the teacher, they will sprint towards the teacher as soon as they turn, and then will need to adjust their speed to meet the ball.

This will teach the defender to meet the ball with speed, but also teach them to steady themselves before making contact with it.

 

24 - Playing the ball from a throw 

This involves the pupil being able to pass or "play" the ball to a team mate from his chest or head. The reason that we are not practicing this from our feet is due to the reasons throw ins are usual thrown high, meaning the head and chest are the perfect place to play the ball in a game situation.

The teacher should throw the ball gently to the pupil anywhere between the chest and head. This is the perfect place to throw the ball as it will cause the pupil to make a decision whether to use their chest or head, causing them also to react.

The pupil should return the ball using either their chest or head.

 


25 - Controlling the ball progression - Trapping - Chest

This is an important skill to get, and is usually used after the ball has bounced. It involves controlling or "trapping" the ball when it is in the air. The ball is usually trapped with either the thighs or chest.

To practice trapping with the chest, the teacher should stand a few meters away from the pupil, and throw the ball to the ground so it bounces up at them at around chest height. The pupil at this point should lean back slightly, and "cushion" the ball with the chest. When the ball makes contact with you, lean forwards and bring the shoulders to an arched position.

The ball should then drop to the players feet. This is a brilliant skill to master and will help in many different game situations, such as bringing the ball down from goal kicks, throw ins, corners and many more.

 


26 - Controlling the ball progression - Trapping - Thighs

This again is a progression from the last drill, and involves using the thighs instead of the chest. This is used when the ball is fairly low to the ground, but to high to use the foot and too low to use the chest.

The teacher should throw the ball so it bounces up just above the pupils knees. As it bounces the pupil should position themselves into the right position where the ball will hit their thighs. Then. bend the knees, and get into a "squat" position (the teacher may have to explain this position to the pupil.) The ball should bounce up and land on the pupils thighs, the theirs should "cushion" the ball, so it will not bounce of into the air. After the ball has hit the thighs, the pupil should straighten his legs and body causing the ball to drop down to his feet.

 


27 - Controlling the ball progression - Foot


The foot is also a good way of bring a ball in the air, under control. Its a simple drill, but involves, precision timing and accuracy.
When the ball is in the air, as it comes down, the pupil should use the large part of his boot to controll the ball. The pupil must balance himself. When the time is right, and the ball is falling, he should place his foot under the ball in mid air so that the ball is gently touching it, and then should bring his foot down at the same speed as the ball, to gain controll.

 


28 - Striking the ball - Lifting the ball

Lifting the ball is a skill needed for many players on the football pitch, from a goal keeper, to a striker. Some people believe that leaning back is needed to lift the ball. But however, most of the time, people lean back more then needed which effects their range and accuracy.

Leaning back will occur naturally when kicking the ball, its needed to keep yourself balanced. However, where the foot hits the ball is critical for a lifting ball! Use a sweeping action from leaning forward with the foot behind you, to leaning slightly backwards (not over emphasised) with the foot hitting the bottom of the ball, and the leg following through to create a 180 degrees from your foot behind you almost parallel, to in-front of you.

To practice, the teacher should firstly watch the pupil practicing this sweeping action with no ball, to check they are balanced and using the correct technique.After they have gained the correct technique, give them a ball, and tell them to get it in a straight line and off the floor. They may begin by chipping the ball. This is ok, it means they are hitting the ball in the right place, just make sure they follow all the way through.



29 - Striking the ball - Power


Striking with power is needed for most players on the pitch. From a defender kicking for distance, or a striking for am goal. This drill is different to the last as lift is no longer important, but accuracy and power are.
To strike the ball with power, the pupil needs to keep his eye on the middle of the ball, this is the area where he will strike it. Swing the foot back and then forwards again as fast as you can and really aim to get as much power as possible when making contact with the ball. Really hit it like you mean it. Your foot should follow through and your leg should end up straight. Sometimes players kick the ball so hard the momentum from the follow through causes them to be lifted off the ground momentarily!


30 - Striking the ball - Long ball with Lift


This is a mixture between the last two striking drills. It involves lifting the ball but also applying some power.
Make sure that the pupil is kicking just below the middle of the ball, give it the same chipping motion, but apply power, this power will give it distance and also cause the ball to lift more. To practice this, place the ball a few steps away from yourself and look at the ball just below the middle.
Placing the foot that will not be kicking the ball is just as important. If it is too close to the ball, then you will not be able to lift it enough, however, too far away from the ball and the ball will be lifted to much. Teacher it is vital for you to look out to see if the pupil is planting their foot to close or far away from the ball.

 

31 - Striking the ball - Curling the ball

Curling the ball is a skill that is desired by many different footballers, and if performed properly can prove to be a very useful skill to have. Curling the ball is all in the name. It involves the ball curling or bending in mid air, and can be great to confuse a goal keeper in a shooting opportunity. Curling the ball is a hard skill to grasp which takes time and a lot of practice. Curling the ball, adding power to the ball, and adding lift to the ball create a recipe for a goal. If all of these things are used together and performed correctly with good technique, a good striker will be formed.
Using the lace of the boot provides many options. You can either curl the ball left or right and you can control how much lift and power you put on the ball. If you are trying to teach a young player, it is better to not over complicate things to much and just give them the general technique of curling.To strike the ball correctly use the inner part of the port, near the lace holes.
To practice the pupil should first stand next to the ball getting the feel for the correct action. The kick should almost feel like you are trying to slice the ball. Aim your foot just below the middle part of the ball and follow your foot through. If that motion feels comfortable, trying doing the same thing without a ball, but with a run up of a few steps. Just to learn where to plant your foot that will not be kicking, and so you know the general motion from a run up, and how much speed to introduce.
Now you are ready to introduce the ball. Jog up to the ball from the side and use the same motion but add some power. To curl the ball outwards, it is important that you strike the ball with the outside of the foot, using the holes next to the lases on the other side of the boot. As before follow your foot through as you strike.
Curling the football will not produce any good effect unless the ball travels fairly low to the ground and hits then target accurately. If performed badly, the move can end up looking like a miss kick and could result in the player slicing the ball, but its worth practicing, because when performed fluently its a great skill to grasp.